GOVERNOR PARSON ANNOUNCES MISSOURI WILL FULLY REOPEN, ENTER PHASE 2 OF RECOVERY PLAN ON JUNE 16

 — Pending expiration of Phase 1 on June 15, Governor Mike Parson announced today that Missouri will fully reopen and enter Phase 2 of its “Show Me Strong Recovery” Plan on Tuesday, June 16, 2020.

“It is truly incredible to think about how far Missouri has come since March. At that time, no one knew what to expect. There was a lot of uncertainty, worry, and concern,” Governor Parson said. “Here we are today, just over 90 days since our first COVID-19 case in Missouri, and I am proud to say we have overcome all of these challenges and more than met our four pillars to reopen.”

During Phase 2, there will be no statewide health order. All statewide restrictions will be lifted, though local officials will still have the authority to put further rules, regulations, or ordinances in place.

The decision to reopen was dependent on the four essential “Show Me Strong Recovery” pillars:

  1. Expand testing capacity and volume in the state
  2. Expand reserves of PPE by opening public and private supply chains
  3. Continue to monitor and, if necessary, expand hospital and health care system capacity
  4. Improve ability to predict potential outbreaks using Missouri’s public health data

Weekly testing in Missouri has increased more than 220 percent from approximately 16,000 test encounters the week of April 20 to over 53,000 encounters the week of May 25. Over the past two weeks, the state has averaged more than 10,000 tests per weekday.

Missouri continues to receive and distribute PPE across the state. Yesterday, the state reached a record PPE shipment, expanding to include not only hospitals, health care facilities, and EMS but also dental offices as more are reopening across the state. Yesterday’s shipments included the following:

  • 17,230 gowns
  • 42,720 N95 masks
  • 262,000 gloves
  • 77,100 surgical masks
  • 18,432 face shields

Missouri has also received national recognition for the use of its PPE marketplace, which helps health care providers with Missouri manufactures and suppliers. Currently, there are over 100 hospitals, 436 suppliers, and 1,567 health care providers, businesses, and other organizations registered in the PPE marketplace.

Regarding hospital capacity, hospitalizations fell by 43 percent statewide from May 1 to June 10. In April, the state converted a hotel into an alternate care site in just 11 days.

Missouri now also has a comprehensive COVID-19 dashboard containing data from across the state on testing, positivity rate, deaths, and hospitalizations. Much of the data is broken down further by county or demographics.

“We have learned and accomplished so much since March. Knowing what we know now, we are much better prepared to deal with COVID-19 going forward, and we are fully confident that Missouri is ready to take the next step,” Governor Parson said.

While Missouri will fully reopen on June 16, Governor Parson emphasized the importance of continuing social distancing and practicing proper hygiene to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

“We must remember that COVID-19 is not gone,” Governor Parson said. “It is still extremely important for everyone to continue social distancing. Be proactive. Avoid large, congested crowds, and if you can’t social distance, take extra precautions to protect yourself and those around you.”

“We all know how to do this now, and it is up to us to take responsibility for our own actions,” Governor Parson continued.

In preparation of Phase 2, Governor Parson signed Executive Order 20-12 extending the state of emergency in Missouri through December 30, 2020, in order to utilize federal CARES Act funding. Extending the state of emergency will also allow continued flexibility in deploying resources around the state as Missouri reopens and recovers from COVID-19.

Executive Order 20-12 also further extends four previous Executive Orders assisting with Missouri’s COVID-19 response through December 30:

  • Executive Order 20-04 easing regulatory burdens and certain provisions related to telemedicine and motor carriers
  • Executive Order 20-05 allowing the sale of unprepared restaurant foods to the public
  • Executive Order 20-06 mobilizing the National Guard in our response efforts
  • Executive Order 20-08 waiving the requirement for a person to be physically present in front of a notary public

Extending these Executive Orders is consistent with the emergency declaration and gives Missourians more time to adjust as the state works through the economic recovery process. To view Executive Order 20-12, click here.

Governor Parson was joined today by Missouri Department of Economic Development Director Rob Dixon to share more details about the state’s recovery plans as well as a new economic recovery dashboard.

To view Governor Parson’s remarks from today’s briefing, click here. Pictures will be available on Governor Parson’s Flickr page.

VISIT THE OFFICIAL ONLINE PRESS RELEASE >>>

Updated On-site Sewage Disposal System Ordinance for Pike County, Missouri

The Pike County Health Department has enacted an updated On-site Sewage Disposal System ordinance to begin on July 1, 2020.

(Updated 7/6/2020)

On July 1. 2020 a new version of the Onsite Wastewater Disposal System Ordinance became effective.  There are two major changes to this ordinance; there is no longer a 3-acre exemption and installers must carry a $20,000.00 bond. So, what does this mean?

Before this ordinance was enacted all properties in Pike County were required to follow the state requirements when designing and installing a new onsite wastewater treatment systems. However, only commercial properties and properties under 3-acres were required to have a permit and inspection by the Health Department. The new law requires all property owners, regardless of property size, to have a permit and inspection from the health department. The additional cost to citizens incurred will be $115.00 (for the permit) for property owners with MORE than three acres; there is no additional cost to property owners of under 3 acres, they have always paid the permit fee. All property owners have always been required to follow the state and county guidelines for septic installation, however, there was no oversite for properties larger than 3-acres. By removing this exemption to oversite, we are better protecting all our property owners and the environment regardless of lot size.

Existing systems, that are functioning properly, will be allowed to continue without permit or inspection. Only if that system needs major repair, replacement, or has a substantiated complaint about it, will it be required to have a permit and inspection from the Health Department.

The second major change is septic system installers are now required to carry a $20,000.00 (twenty thousand dollars) bond rather than a $10,000.00 (ten thousand dollar) bond. This is because the new advanced systems usually cost more than $10,000.00. Increasing this bond amount better protects our citizens, if that bond needs to be accessed there is enough money to replace the system.

This new ordinance represents the first time that the septic code in Pike County has been updated since 2001. In 2001 the Pike County Commissioners delegated the authority for septic system over site and code implementation to the Pike County Health Board, this authority is allowed through Chapter 198 RSMo and then in 2004 relinquished to the Pike County Health Department their authority of enforcement.  In the past 19 years no changes were made to the ordinance. The Pike County Health Board is made up of elected officials. They hold final approval for changes to this ordinance and are tasked with protecting public health. Appropriate septic systems, that properly treat human waste are an important step in protecting public health and property values.

At the time of this change Pike and Lincoln Counties were the only counties in our area that allowed any exemption to the permit/inspection section of the law. Lincoln County allows for properties of over 40 acres to install without a permit, however it is still required to be an appropriate system. Allowing for this exemption was negatively impacting our citizens. Many bank loans are requiring proof of an appropriate septic system and without a permit/inspection there is no proof. When there is no proof, the next step is to hire a septic system inspector and try to find the system to prove that it is appropriate. Citizens are also having trouble re-financing without proof of an appropriate system.

A $115.00 permit fee for all property owners regardless of their property size is now required. Previously, all property owners had been required to install an appropriate system but those with 3 acres or more did not require an inspection to ensure a proper system was being installed. With this fee comes the proof many financial institutions are requiring. This proof, in the form of an inspection report and all additional system information, is required to be kept as records at the Health Department for the next 100 years and so will be available for our citizens.

These two changes: removing the 3-acre exemption and increasing the installers bond are important to protect public health and Pike County property values. If you have additional questions or concerns with this matter please contact Stefanie Davis, Environmentalist, Pike County Health Department at 573-470-1541 x113

The new ordinance can be found here on our website.

Drive-through Community COVID-19 Testing in Pike County

COMMUNITY COVID-19 TESTING IN PIKE COUNTY:

FRIDAY, JUNE 19

PIKE COUNTY, MO – The Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services (DHSS) and Missouri National Guard will perform drive-through community testing for COVID-19 at the Pike County Fairgrounds on Friday June 19 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The test is open to all Missouri residents; they do not have to have COVID-19 symptoms to be eligible for the test. There is no cost for the test for the individual. Any Missouri resident who wants to be tested with a nasal swab to see if they have an active COVID-19 infection can do so.

Appointments are available through DHSS at www.health.mo.gov/communitytest or by calling the state hotline at (877) 435- 8411. Individuals will be given a 15-minute appointment block.

 

“We are grateful for the opportunity to partner with Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services and the Missouri National Guard on this event,” said Rhonda Stumbaugh, Administrator. “It will help in the efforts to learn more about the prevalence of COVID-19 transmission in our area and we hope our community will consider choosing to take advantage of this opportunity.”

The address for the Pike County Fairgrounds is 15884 US-54, Bowling Green, MO 63334. There are 21 counties statewide conducting testing over a 2-week period, beginning on June 8. DHSS has stated that the goal is to test 10,900 people over those 2 weeks.

According to DHSS, location selection for this period of community sampling is based on inadequate testing according to the number of confirmed cases and the number of total tests conducted prior to these events. Counties hosting upcoming community testing events are Scott, Platte, Stoddard, Carter, Ripley, Cass, Franklin, Johnson, Pettis, Lafayette, Ray, Warren, Carroll, Chariton, Lincoln, Lewis, Moniteau, Pike, Scotland, Montgomery and Osage.

Upon arrival at the testing site, individuals will drive through, and be asked questions, including about symptoms they may or may not have. Members of the National Guard will collect the nasopharyngeal specimen.

Those who receive a positive test should stay home, isolate themselves and call their health care provider if they have any concerns.

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Protecting our Communities is a Team Effort

Food Vendor - Food Safety Training | Mobile Food Vendor - Food ...

As summer starts to make its way into our area that means that more events will soon be organized. While our agency continues to recommend that our county residents follow the guidelines issued by the State of Missouri as well as the CDC, we strive to assist local businesses, schools, and community organizations on how to implement these recommended actions.

As your local Health Department, our role is to help the community understand and put into action these recommendations through guidance and education. While these guidelines are only recommendations for what we can do during these re-opening phases to slow the spread of COVID-19, we urge the community to continue making safe decisions particularly in ways that protect persons at increased risk of severe illness. During this phase we continue to encourage social distancing and proper hand hygiene as it is each individuals responsibility to take action against this virus.

 

We encourage the public and community entities to reach out to us if you would like assistance in how to implement mitigation strategies during these re-opening phases. Please use our COVID-19 contact form that can be found on our dedicated COVID-19 webpage found on our website at www.pikecountyhealth.org or call 573-324-2111.

PCHD Reports First COVID-19 Death

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Media Contact:

Tracy Brookshier, Public Information Officer

tbrookshier@pikecountyhealth.org

Media Line: (573) 324-2111 ext. 140

 

 

Pike Health Department Reports First Death of COVID-19

 

PIKE COUNTY, MO (May 8, 2020) – The Pike Health Department today was notified of the first death of a Pike County resident due to COVID-19. The resident was an elderly female.  She test positive for COVID-19 on April 24, 2020.

“It is with a heavy heart that we extend our sympathy,” says Administrator Rhonda Stumbaugh “our thoughts and prayers are with the family at this time”.

Stumbaugh stressed the importance of following guidelines from the Missouri Department of Health as well as the Pike County Health Department.  It is a crucial time, she said, “that we all work together and do our part to stop the spread of COVID-19 to prevent any more precious lives taken as a result of this virus”.

Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for more serious complications from COVID-19. If you think, you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your health care provider for medical advice before showing up.

For more information, visit the DHSS website at www.health.mo.gov/coronavirus or the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus. A statewide COVID-19 hotline also operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 877-435-8411.

 

Download the press release here >>>

 

 

Show me Strong Recovery Plan

Missouri Governor Parson released information yesterday afternoon regarding the initial recovery phase for our state. This Order establishes the minimum requirements that must be complied with statewide. Our agency and local authorities are able to enforce more restrictive public health requirements for businesses or individuals depending on the current COVID-19 threat/evaluation of our county.

Pike County’s Stay-At-Home Order expires on Thursday, April 30th at 11:59 p.m. Once this order has expired, residents are encouraged to follow state guidelines of the Stay Home Missouri order and Show-Me Strong Recovery Plan. Even though the state is “opening” this does not mean we are immune to this virus and we should continue to practice social distancing, proper hygiene and other preventative measures to keep our numbers low. We are all ready to get back to “normal” but we need to ensure we are doing so with much caution.

 

The following information was obtained from Missouri Governor Parson’s website

 

Missouri’s initial recovery phase begins May 4, 2020, and during this phase we can gradually start to reopen economic and social activity. This will be a deliberate process, and is flexible to adapt to the situation. Some communities may be able to reopen at a faster rate, while others may need to continue restrictions to keep the virus from spreading. During this time, we should limit our activity and interactions and continue to maintain social distancing and practice good hygiene to protect our neighbors and ourselves.

Show-Me Strong Recovery Order, through May 31, 2020

Stay Home Order, EXTENDED through May 3, 2020

Stay Home Order – FAQs

Stay Home Order, through April 24, 2020

 

SHOW-ME STRONG RECOVERY PLAN: PHASE I
GUIDELINES AND FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Missouri’s economic recovery plan will focus on the diversity of Missouri – its people, businesses, communities, and infrastructure, among others. A strategic “re-opening” of Missouri’s economy will not be successful without proactive steps taken to mitigate risk of COVID-19 resurgence by our state’s businesses, communities, and citizens.

While the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has issued guidance on what the federal government considers “essential businesses,” Governor Parson believes that ALL of Missouri’s businesses and employers are vital to our state’s economy and individual well-being.

General Guidelines to Reopen Missouri’s Economy

During Phase I, we can gradually start to reopen economic and social activity. This will be a deliberate process, and is flexible to adapt to the situation. Some communities may be able to reopen at a faster rate, while others may need to continue restrictions to keep the virus from spreading. During Phase I, we should limit our activity and interactions and continue to maintain social distancing and practice good hygiene to protect our neighbors and ourselves.

The plan to reopen the economy and get Missourians back to work is based on ensuring a healthy workforce by:

  • Flattening the curve and expanding healthcare capacity, while utilizing federal programs and deploying state resources;
  • Making decisions based on Missouri-specific data and medical expertise;
  • Protecting healthcare workers, first responders, and other direct care workers so that our citizens have access to the care they need;
  • Looking after our most vulnerable and at-risk populations;
  • Partnering with community leaders and incorporating flexibility based on each community’s circumstances;
  • Slowing and containing the spread of COVID-19; and
  • Implementing a measured approach to mitigate risk of a resurgence.

The ability to reopen Missouri’s economy rests on both our healthcare system and our healthcare suppliers. Together, we will accomplish the following goals:

  • Rapidly expand testing capacity and volume in the state, including testing for those who are currently contagious and those who have developed immunity to the virus;
  • Expanding reserves of personal protective equipment (PPE) by opening public and private supply chains, and continuing to utilize Missouri businesses in that effort;
  • Continuing to monitor and, if necessary, expanding hospital and health care system capacity, including isolation and alternate care facilities for those that cannot self-quarantine at home; and
  • Improving the ability to predict potential outbreaks using Missouri’s public health data.

General Guidelines for Missourians

  • Citizens who feel sick should stay home
  • Continue to practice good hygiene, including:
  • Washing hands with soap and water, or using hand sanitizer, especially after touching frequently used items or surfaces;
  • Avoiding touching your face;
  • Sneezing or coughing into a tissue, or the inside of your elbow; and
  • Disinfecting frequently used items and surfaces as much as possible.
  • Avoid socializing in groups that do not readily allow for appropriate physical distancing (receptions, trade shows, etc.). When in public (parks, outdoor recreation spaces, shopping malls, etc.), individuals should maximize physical distance from others.
  • Minimize travel to the extent possible.

General Guidelines for Business

  • Prepare to implement basic infection prevention measures informed by industry best practices, regarding:
    • Protective equipment;
    • Temperature checks;
    • Testing, isolating, and contact tracing; and
    • Sanitation, including disinfection of common and high-traffic areas (entrances, breakrooms, locations where there is high-frequency employee interaction with the public/customers).
  • Modify physical workspaces to maximize social distancing.
  • Minimize business travel.
  • Develop an infectious disease preparedness and response plan, including policies and procedures for workforce contact tracing when an employee tests positive for COVID-19.
  • Monitor workforce for indicative symptoms. Do not allow symptomatic people to physically return to work until cleared by a medical provider.
  • Develop, implement, and communicate about workplace flexibilities and protections, including:
    • Encouraging telework whenever possible and feasible with business operations;
    • Returning to work in phases and/or split shifts, if possible;
    • Limiting access to common areas where personnel are likely to congregate and interact; and
    • Ensuring that sick leave policies are flexible and consistent with public health guidance.

General Guidelines for Communities

  • Closely monitor and track the containment, spread, and any resurgence of COVID-19, and adjust plans as necessary.
  • Limit situations where citizens cannot maintain social distancing.
  • Facilitate widespread testing of symptomatic and asymptomatic citizens.
  • Work to protect the most vulnerable populations.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Under guidance from the federal government, we are considered an “essential business.” How does this order affect me?

This order applies to ALL Missouri businesses. Businesses that are categorized as “essential” by the federal government should continue current operations, and incorporate our General Guidelines for Business outlined above.

Businesses that were considered “non-essential” by the federal government may resume operations in Missouri in accordance with the Order and these guidelines.

What if my job requires me to be within six feet (6’) of another employee and/or customer?

The social distancing requirements do not apply to individuals performing job duties that require contact with other people closer than six feet (6’).

Businesses and employees should work together to implement public health and safety measures for employees and customers, using the above direction as a guide, in addition to any guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Under these conditions, businesses such as barber and cosmetology shops, hair salons, and tattoo parlors are allowed to operate.

Gyms and hotel swimming pools can also open if they adhere to strict social distancing and sanitation protocols.

Are there restrictions on businesses?

Yes. Workplaces that are engaged in retail sales to the public must limit the number of customers in each retail location to the following standards based on the workplace’s fire or building code occupancy:

  • For smaller locations (less than 10,000 square feet), they must maintain 25 percent or less of the authorized occupancy;
  • For larger locations (10,000 square feet or greater), they must maintain 10 percent or less of the authorized occupancy.

Employees at the workplace and vendors delivering products into the store are not included in this calculation and do not count toward occupancy limitations.

Are grocery stores considered a business “engaged in retail sales to the public?”

Yes, and such stores are subject to the occupancy limitations in the Order.

Grocery stores are strongly encouraged to set aside hours, outside of regular store hours, to allow third-party grocery delivery services to provide grocery shopping services for their customers. This will allow individual shoppers to shop during regular store hours, and reduce congestion during such times. This will further allow such services to function in an environment where their services may be in excessive demand.

Shoppers at all retail stores are also encouraged, when possible, to limit the number of people shopping in stores to one person per household at any one time. This will better enable all families to access necessary goods in grocery stores, and further reduce the number of individuals necessary to access such goods.

My local jurisdiction does not have a building or fire code. Do the limitations on square footage apply to my retail business?

Yes. If your business is not subject to fire or building code occupancy limitations set by your local jurisdiction, you should calculate your occupancy limits based on the following formula:

For a business with a retail location less than 10,000 square feet:

  • Building Square Feet divided by 30 = Quotient
  • Quotient x .25 = Occupancy Limit

For a business with the retail location of 10,000 square feet or more:

  • Building Square Feet divided by 30 = Quotient
  • Quotient x .10 = Occupancy Limit

Examples:

  • A 40,000 square foot grocery store would be able to have 133 customers in the store at any one time.
  • An 8,000 square foot retail store would be able to have 66 customers in the store at any one time.

My local fire or building code occupancy limitation calculation is lower than that allowed for businesses without any fire or building code limits, or is lower than a neighboring jurisdictions fire or building code limitations. Can I apply the same formula for calculating occupancy for my business as those without a code?

Yes. You may use either the calculation set forth above for businesses without a fire or building code occupancy limitation, or the calculation applied to your business based upon your specific local jurisdiction fire and building code occupancy limitation, whichever is greater.
Examples:

  • My 30,000 square foot retail business has a local jurisdiction fire or building occupancy limitation of 700 people. Using the formula allowing only 10% of the local jurisdiction, I would be able to have 70 customers in my store at any one time. For an identical business without a local fire or occupancy limitation, they would be able to have 100 customers in their store at any one time. Under this guidance, you may have up to 100 customers in your store at any one time.
  • My 6,000 square foot retail business has a local jurisdiction fire or building occupancy limitation of 150 people. Using the formula allowing only 25% of the local jurisdiction, I would be able to have 37 customers in my store at any one time. For an identical business without a local fire or occupancy limitation, they would be able to have 50 customers in their store at any one time. Under this guidance, you may have up to 50 customers in your store at any one time.

My business has a public waiting room with congregate seating. Should I limit access to it?

Implementing a system where customers/citizens can wait inside their vehicles prior to entering the business is strongly encouraged, as are pre-scheduled appointments to minimize interaction between people. In situations where this is not feasible, such as public transit, medical offices, and parks, entities should develop public health and safety measures using the above direction as a guide, in addition to any guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Does this order prevent me from receiving non-emergency healthcare, such as a routine eye exam or dental care?

Medical providers, such as dentists and optometrists, may provide usual services at their discretion. The social distancing requirements do not apply to individuals performing job duties that require contact with other people closer than six feet (6’).

Medical providers should develop and implement public health and safety measures for employees and patients, using the above direction as a guide, in addition to any guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Implementing a system where patients can wait inside their vehicles prior to entering the office is strongly encouraged, as are pre-scheduled and spaced out appointments to minimize interaction between people.

May restaurants open their dining rooms?

Yes. In concert with the Missouri Restaurant Association, we are strongly encouraging restaurants to prioritize public health and safety by implementing measures including, but not limited to, regulating self-serve options such as salad bars and buffets, using disposable menus, and employee use of personal protective equipment if available. Tables and seating shall be spaced out according to social distance requirements.

The continued use of drive-thru, pickup, or delivery options is encouraged.

Food court establishments may operate, but the social distancing and communal seating requirements will prevent them from offering seating.

How do these guidelines apply to childcare facilities?

Daycares, childcare providers, or schools providing childcare for working families can continue operations, but should follow the CDC guidance targeted for those operations found at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/guidance-for-childcare.html.

May I attend service at my place of worship?

Yes. As long as the social distancing requirements are followed, places of worship are allowed to hold in-person services. Common practices that may occur with worship services, such as hand shaking and shared communion cups, should be avoided. Places of worship are also encouraged to continue use of alternative means of services through streaming services and other opportunities.

I am a member of a fraternal organization. Are we allowed to open our building and meet?

Yes. Fraternal organizations such as the Knights of Columbus and the Fraternal Order of Eagles may gather, but must adhere to the social distancing and communal seating areas requirements.

Will I still be able to participate in my local parks and recreation organized activities and/or camps this summer?

Yes. Traditional summer activities such as utilizing aquatic facilities, community centers, fitness centers, libraries, organized athletics, and camps offer a variety of recreational opportunities for Missouri citizens. If these services are offered, we encourage adjustments be considered to mitigate the risks of contracting or spreading COVID-19 between participants, patrons, and staff, such as limiting the number of participants, modifying activities, restructuring programs, and increasing sanitization measures for facilities and participants.

We also advise areas of high touch or high traffic, such as playgrounds, remain closed.

Can I attend an event at a large venue or stadium, or go to a movie theater?

Yes. However, seating shall be spaced out according to social distancing requirements.

This will apply to events such as amusement parks and attractions, concerts, funerals, museums, school graduations and weddings.

How will this order be enforced?

The State is working with local health authorities to support the order. Local health authorities and law enforcement maintain the same jurisdiction and authority they have always had.

Can my local health authority impose requirements that are more restrictive?

Yes. This Order establishes the minimum requirements that must be complied with statewide. Local health authorities may enforce more restrictive public health requirements for businesses or individuals.

The only exception is the Order from the Director of the Department of Health and Senior Services dated March 24, 2020, removing the authority of a local health authority from closing or restricting the operations of a business which is a part of the food supply, whether that be agricultural production, manufacturing, distribution, or sale of food. This limited waiver does not limit the authority of a local health authority from closing or restricting the operations of a retail food establishment.

How long is this order in effect?

The Order is in place through Sunday, May 31, 2020. The Order will be re-evaluated before it expires, and may be further restricted, less restricted, or extended in the current form.

 

This information directly from Missouri Governor Parson’s Website >>>

Evidence of Community Spread of COVID-19 in Pike County, MO

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 27, 2020

Media Contact:

Tracy Brookshier, Public Information Officer

tbrookshier@pikecountyhealth.org

Media Line: (573) 324-2111 ext. 140

 

Community Spread of COVID-19 in Pike County, MO

 

Pike County, MO- Pike County has now seen evidence of community spread of COVID-19 in 2 cases. Community spread means people have been infected in an area (such as a county), including some who are not sure how or where they became infected. Pike County Health Department staff has begun contact investigations and notifications regarding these two cases. Any close contacts of positive cases will be contacted individually.

 

These community spread cases highlight the extreme importance of social distancing and following the recommended guidelines to stay safe including avoiding social gatherings of more than 10 people and staying home whenever possible. If individuals must go out for essential activities, such as work or getting supplies, they shall keep a distance of 6 feet from others, wear face coverings and practice proper hygiene. Other essential activities include engaging in tasks essential to health.

 

Close contacts are considered those who were within 6 feet with no face coverings for more than 10 minutes and up to 48 hours of when the positive case developed symptoms. It is unnecessary to list itineraries for cases where close contacts are able to be identified throughout the investigation process. Thus far, all case investigations have been able to identify all close contacts. At a time where a positive case would have been in a public setting within close contact of unknown individuals would be when the listing of an itinerary would become potentially necessary to ensure public safety.

 

At this time there are 2 cases that are hospitalized and the others are/were in in-home isolation.

 

Residents can expect weekday case count updates at 9:00 a.m. & 3:00 p.m. Case counts can be found on the Pike County Health Department website, Facebook and Twitter pages. Because Missouri’s numbers have grown, the state lab is only sending positive results. Pike County Health Department will only be providing the updated total number of positives in the county each day and are unable to list accurate numbers for pending cases or negative results.

 

The Pike County Health Department would like to remind residents to get their information from credible and reliable sources, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.CDC.gov , the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services at www.health.mo.gov and the Pike County Health Department at www.pikecountyhealth.org For general questions about COVID-19, individuals can call the Missouri hotline number at (877) 435-8411.

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7th Case of COVID-19 in Pike County, Missouri Confirmed

Today we report 1 more positive case of COVID-19 in Pike County that is currently under investigation.
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As it has been 14 consecutive days since our last confirmed positive case we remain cautiously optimistic that our county will continue to slow the spread.
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To say we are PROUD of our county would be an understatement.
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Pike County, Missouri has a population of over 18,504* people and we have reported 7 positive cases to date during this pandemic. Put that into percentage form and you will get an approximate 0.037% of our county population that tested positive with the novel-coronavirus (COVID-19).

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We take the health of our community very seriously and it is very apparent that our residents do too. As our expertise is in public health, you can’t imagine how great of a feeling that is for us. Our friends, families and neighbors have taken this pandemic seriously and because of that we have very low numbers of positive cases within our county; together we can ensure it stays that way.

With the nation gearing up to re-open in the recommended phases, it will be our duty as your local Public Health Department to work with other state and local officials to ensure we are doing so in a way that we can reduce the chance of COVID-19 making a return.

The businesses in our county have done an incredible job of getting creative with safe ways to serve the community through this time of uncertainty and we are confident they will continue to do so.

We continue to urge residents to keep taking the preventative measures so that we do not see another spike in cases. It is unclear when we can consider ourselves back to “normal” but we are confident that we will get there safely with the help of the amazing residents of Pike County, Missouri….
THAT’S YOU! THANK YOU!

*Population from 2018 census.

eWIC coming this Summer

All WIC agencies will move from providing checks to using electronic benefit transfer (EBT) to deliver WIC food benefits. This transition to EBT, referred to as eWIC, will create an easier shopping experience. WIC families will be able to purchase products over multiple trips to the store rather than purchasing everything at one time during the month. For Pike County, Missouri WIC Clients, this update is scheduled to take place by August 2020.

Participants should know these key points regarding the upcoming upgrade to the new card:

  • eWIC card requires a PIN to use benefits for increased security
  • eWIC card will be similar to a debit card for increased privacy
  • Benefits for each household will be on one card, rather than multiple checks, and issued for up to three months at a time for convenience
  • In-store transactions will be quicker
  • WIC food items may be purchased as needed throughout the month, instead of all at one time

 

In addition, there is now a Missouri WIC mobile app for participants:

  • The application will assist participants in identifying WIC-approved food items at the grocery store. The application will allow participants to scan an item’s UPC code to ensure that it is a WIC-approved item before checking out, reducing the need to return an unapproved product to the shelf.
  • The application will feature nutritional information, food preparation tips, and recipes to help WIC participants get the most out of the WIC program.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

What is an eWIC card?

An eWIC card holds WIC food benefits that the participant can use at the grocery store.

 

Will SNAP benefits and WIC benefits be on the same card?

No. The eWIC card for the WIC program will be separate from the EBT card for the SNAP program.

 

Will participants still be able to use their checks that were already printed?

Yes. Participants will still be able to use their checks until they run out and should have no reason to switch over to an eWIC card early unless they have a food package change or the checks are stolen.

 

Will the eWIC card be able to have three (3) months’ worth of benefits loaded onto it?

Yes. The eWIC card will have the ability to hold three (3) months’ worth of benefits. Unused benefits will expire in the same way as they do with the current check system. Participants will still have to return to the WIC clinic to receive additional benefits and nutrition education.

 

Will there be one (1) card for all household members on WIC?

Yes. All family members on WIC in the same household will have their benefits on one (1) card. Foster children will receive their own cards. You will use this card at every appointment to add the next set of benefits. The card is not to be used and then thrown away.

 

Who can change the PIN?

Only the authorized representative can change the PIN for an eWIC card.

 

Do participants need to show identification with their eWIC card at the grocery store?

No. Proper identification is not required with the eWIC card at the grocery store. The PIN will be the participant’s identification for using the card.

 

How will the eWIC card work at the store?

The process will be very similar to using a debit or credit card. Participants will shop for their WIC approved items as usual. At checkout, the eWIC card will be inserted into the card reader where WIC approved items will be deducted from the balance of the benefit package on the card. Unused benefits will remain on the card and will expire the last day of the month at midnight.

 

What happens if a participant loses their card?

If a participant loses their eWIC card, it will be placed on the Hot Card List and after a 5-day waiting period the authorized representative will be able to come into the local agency with appropriate proof of identity to get a new one.

 

Will retailers accept checks and eWIC cards?

Yes. With the transition to eWIC, retailers will accept both eWIC cards and checks.

 

Can eWIC cards be used at self-checkout registers?

No. Technology is still under development by retailers.

 

Can participants shop in other states with their Missouri eWIC card?

No. Missouri eWIC cards are ONLY accepted at Missouri authorized WIC retailers.

 

What happens to eWIC cards of foster children when they move to a different household?

The eWIC card should follow the foster child. Each foster child will be assigned an eWIC card of their own. If multiple foster children reside in one household, the authorized representative may label each card with the child’s initials to keep them separated.

 

Can eWIC cards be used at all stores?

No. Missouri eWIC cards can only be used at stores displaying the Missouri eWIC Authorized Retailer decal.

 

What should I do if an item on the WIC Approved Food List does not get deducted from my eWIC card at checkout?

After scanning all items, WIC-approved food items will be deducted from the eWIC card. Check the receipt to ensure the items are correctly deducted before pressing the key to confirm your purchase.

 

What is the WICShopper Application?

WICShopper is a specialized WIC smartphone application. The application will assist participants in identifying WIC-approved food items at the grocery store. The application will allow participants to scan an item’s Universal Product Code (UPC) to ensure that it is a WIC-approved item before checking out. The application will feature nutritional information, food preparation tips, and recipes to help WIC participants get the most out of the WIC program.

 

When will I get my eWIC card?

After your local agency transitions to eWIC, you will receive your eWIC card at your next scheduled appointment. There is no reason to switch over to an eWIC card early unless you have a food package change or your checks are lost or stolen.

 

My partner and I share the shopping in our household.  May we each get a card for the same account?

No. Only one card is assigned per household.

 

Learn more >>>

2020 Census and Public Health

Census data is the frame work of nearly every aspect of our duties as your public health department. From research and surveillance to funding levels and making policies, census data also impacts food assistance programs for low-income families and Medicaid funding. According to a study published in February 2019 in APHA’s American Journal of Public Health, an inaccurate 2020 count could hinder public health planning efforts, impede work to eliminate disparities, and make it more difficult to respond to novel and emerging public health threats.

The accuracy of the 2020 census is critical to our agency so that we can continue to serve our community in the capacity we do, and continue to add more services in the future. The amount of funding we receive is based on an accurate population count; and an accurate population count is key for us to apply proper statistics when we are trying to prevent outbreaks and the transmission of communicable and infectious diseases. Secure funding allows us to continue our work in preventing people in our community from getting sick.

Occurring every 10 years, data from the census is used to inform countless decisions across private and public sectors, from how to disperse federal funds and apportion congressional seats to where to build roads, schools and businesses. In 2017 more than 300 federal spending programs relied on 2010 census data to distribute about $1.5 trillion to state and local governments, nonprofits, businesses and households, accounting for nearly 8% of the country’s gross domestic product.

The census letters are expected to hit the majority of households in the US by mid-March. This year will also be the first year that online responses are available which creates a unique opportunity for those to complete the census easily and efficiently. The census reporting is expected to end some time in late July and we urge all of our county residents to take 10 minutes to complete it for their household. You can see each question and how the answers are used on the 2020 Census website. You can respond to the 2020 Census three ways: online, by telephone, or by mail. To fill it out online, go to my2020census.gov. You can use any internet-enabled device (cellphone, computer, tablet, etc.), and answer the questions in 12 different languages.