Louisiana Drive Thru Flu Shot Clinic

We will be hosting a second Drive Thru Flu Shot Clinic in Louisiana to offer more of the high-dose and regular flu vaccines.

Each year we offer flu shot clinics around our county to make it easier for residents to receive their flu shots. This year, the flu vaccine is more important than ever before
PCHD and DHSS urges Missourians to get vaccinated. In a typical year, over 100,000 Missourians become sick from the flu. Many Missourians of all ages become seriously ill and some are hospitalized. 2020 is anything but typical, and state health officials are urging Missourians to get the flu vaccine by the end of October.

 

Join us for our upcoming drive thru flu shot clinic:

County Market Parking Lot, Louisiana, MO
Wednesday, September 30th
2 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Medicare, Medicaid, Most Insurances and Private pay accepted.

Download this flyer >>>

 

 

OR visit our Walk-In clinic with no appointment necessary during our Walk-In Clinic hours:

Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Clarksville Flu Shot Clinic Scheduled

Each year we offer flu shot clinics around our county to make it easier for residents to receive their flu shots. This year, the flu vaccine is more important than ever before
PCHD and DHSS urges Missourians to get vaccinated. In a typical year, over 100,000 Missourians become sick from the flu. Many Missourians of all ages become seriously ill and some are hospitalized. 2020 is anything but typical, and state health officials are urging Missourians to get the flu vaccine by the end of October.

Join us for our upcoming flu shot clinic:

Clarksville City Hall Park
111 Howard Street, Clarksville, MO 63336
Friday, October 9th
11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Medicare, Medicaid, Most Insurances and Private pay accepted.

Download this flyer >>>

 

OR visit our Walk-In clinic with no appointment necessary during our Walk-In Clinic hours:

Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

This year, the flu vaccine is more important than ever before

This year, the flu vaccine is more important than ever before
DHSS urges Missourians to get vaccinated

JEFFERSON CITY, MO — In a typical year, over 100,000 Missourians become sick from the flu. Many Missourians of all ages become seriously ill and some are hospitalized. 2020 is anything but typical, and state health officials are urging Missourians to get the flu vaccine by the end of October.

“We always put individual patients first, and because of that, we are concerned that fewer than half of Missouri adults typically get a flu vaccine. This year, we want to do better. Do it for yourself, or do it to protect your loved ones,” said Dr. Randall Williams, Director of the Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS). “As the Governor has said, we are not powerless against COVID-19. This also applies to the flu. One measure you can take to protect yourself during this time of COVID-19 is to get a flu vaccine.”

Symptoms of flu and COVID-19 significantly overlap one another. Flu symptoms can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches, chills and fatigue. Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea. It is unknown how a person could be affected by experiencing both viruses at the same time.

“To ensure our state has the capacity to care for COVID-19 patients, we need to do whatever we can to prevent strain on our health care system and keep Missourians healthy,” said  Williams. “Flu vaccines are therefore important to the COVID-19 fight. Preventing flu means fewer unnecessary medical visits and hospitalizations. Preventing flu also reduces disruptions to our daily lives – at home, at work, at school.”

DHSS is working closely with local public health agencies to increase immunization rates among adult populations who are most at risk for contracting COVID-19. Ancillary supplies and vaccine transport coolers have also been purchased for local providers to host adult flu vaccine clinics or offer curbside or drive-through clinics. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has provided Missouri with an additional 300,000 adult flu vaccines to meet what is expected to be an increased demand.

“While the effectiveness of the vaccine varies from year to year, studies have shown some protection is better than none at all,” said Williams. “You are less likely to spread the virus to those around you if vaccinated, and it has also been shown to cause symptoms to be more mild if you do become infected.”

Groups of people at high risk for flu-related complications include children age 5 and under, adults older than 65, pregnant women, and those with weakened immune systems or chronic medical conditions such  as asthma, diabetes or heart disease. Those who are in a high risk group and experience symptoms of the flu should contact their primary health care provider.

Flu vaccines are already becoming available, and it is recommended annually for everyone 6 months and older without an increased risk for a serious adverse reaction. Contact your health care provider, or find a location near you using VaccineFinder.

DHSS will launch a multimedia public awareness campaign starting Oct. 1 that focuses on the people–friends, family, front-line workers–who are protected when one person gets vaccinated.

For more information, visit health.mo.gov/flu.

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Attached Photo: Dr. Randall Williams, DHSS Director, received his flu vaccination this morning, September 25, at the Cole County Health Department. 

 

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at http://health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo

Similarities and Differences between Flu and COVID-19

With flu season right around the corner it is important to know the differences between flu and COVID-19. While COVID-19 and flu viruses are thought to spread in similar ways, COVID-19 is more contagious among certain populations and age groups than flu. Also, COVID-19 has been observed to have more superspreading events than flu. This means the virus that causes COVID-19 can quickly and easily spread to a lot of people and result in continuous spreading among people as time progresses.

Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone, and testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis. Flu and COVID-19 share many characteristics, but there are some key differences between the two.

While more is learned every day, there is still a lot that is unknown about COVID-19 and the virus that causes it. This page compares COVID-19 and flu, given the best available information to date.

Learn more from CDC website >>>

Amended Sewage Ordinance

On August 27, 2020 the Board of Trustees for the Pike County Health Department voted to rescind part of the new On-Site Sewage Disposal System Ordinance 2020. The three-acre exemption was put back into the ordinance. They also chose to make this change retro-active to the implementation date of the new ordinance. This means that properties over 3 acres are not required to have a permit and inspection from the Health Department. All other changes made to the ordinance were left in place.  For the order and full ordinance visit our website by using the link below. A physical copy can be found at the County Clerk’s office, or the Health Department.

 

>>>>> The new amended ordinance can be found here on our website.

PCHD reminds community to stay cautious of COVID-19 Virus

August 10, 2020

Pike County, MO – As your local Public Health Department throughout this pandemic we are working considerably hard to address safety concerns and inform the community on how they can help slow the spread of COVID-19 within Pike County.

With our recent rise in positive cases, we feel it necessary to remind everyone that we are still under the Governor’s Executive order which includes social distancing and taking precautions when social distancing cannot be maintained.

As event season is upon us and like all actions during this pandemic, there are significant consequences to the decisions to host/attend mass gatherings, and we are not immune to those effects. While there are no national or State mandates in place that do not allow large events, we as a local health department will not support/recommend such events take place.

Returning to normal is our ultimate goal for not only the physical health of everyone but for our own mental health as well. We encourage our residents to find safe ways to get the fresh air and socialization we all crave during these crazy times while remaining cautious about this active virus within our community. We urge everyone to continue taking preventative measures to help slow the spread of COVID-19 within our county.

This is a recommendation and not a mandate and will remain as such unless there are substantial local changes related to the pandemic or further guidance from state or national levels warrants the enactment of an official mandate. It is the hope that everyone will take precautions and decisions are made in the best interest of our citizens as well as realizing the work load that has been put on our Health Care Providers, Hospital, and Local Health Department.  Pike County Health Department will continue to follow CDC data and recommendations while monitoring any changes in the spread of this virus within our county.

Follow case counts and resources on our website at www.pikecountyhealth.org/covid-19/

 

Missouri pediatricians and state health department encourage parents to seek preventative care

July 27, 2020

JEFFERSON CITY, MO – During the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a decline in the vaccination rates among children across Missouri. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) is partnering with the Missouri Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (MOAAP) to encourage parents to take their children for well-child visits and recommended vaccinations. Well-child visits play a vital role in ensuring children are healthy and protected against vaccine-preventable diseases.

“Well-child visits monitor a child’s growth and development, as well as provide important immunizations,” said Kristin Sohl, MD, FAAP, President, MOAAP. “Routine visits with your child’s pediatrician or primary care provider are essential to keeping your child healthy during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Missouri’s vaccination rates during the COVID-19 pandemic

Missouri has seen a decrease in the number of vaccines given among children since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. In April 2020, there was more than a 50% decrease in the number of vaccines given to children 18 years of age or younger as compared to April 2019. Slight increases in vaccines given were then seen in May and June, but compared to the same timeframe in 2019, the decreases were still more than 35% and 30% for the respective months.

DHSS is partnering with the MOAAP, Federally Qualified Health Centers, local public health agencies, and other community partners to help provide vaccines to Missourians in safe and innovative ways to avoid an outbreak of a vaccine-preventable disease and ensure children are able to enter school as they reopen.

“One of the many things we have been working on is outlining ways that we can help protect students, teachers and their families during this time,” said Randall Williams, MD, FACOG, DHSS Director. “Getting caught up on well-child visits and vaccinations is a proactive measure that we encourage families to take. Many childhood illnesses can be prevented by vaccines, and protecting our immune systems is especially important this school year.”

What are health care providers doing to ensure well-child visits are safe?

Guidance has been given to health care providers on what they can do to ensure safety during the well-child visits. Based on the guidance received from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), providers have implemented procedures and have added precautions to ensure the safety and well-being of Missouri families. For example, offices are bringing patients directly from their cars to a room, utilizing separate entrances, completely separating office space between sick and well-child visits, or holding well-child visits first and then sick visits later in the afternoon with additional cleaning procedures in between visits. These extra steps are being taken to prioritize patient safety and health. Clinics are adapting their office visit procedures in real-time based on the most updated guidance.

Health care providers should determine which children have missed well-child visits and the recommended vaccines and prioritize rescheduling them, starting with newborns.

What can you do to protect yourself and your child/children during well-child visits?

Below are steps people can take to reduce the risk of getting a viral respiratory infection, including COVID-19:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Practice social distancing (staying at least 6 feet from other people who are not from your household in both indoor and outdoor spaces).
  • Wear a face covering (those over the age of 2).
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces.

Based on guidance from CDC, there has been a decrease in the number of vaccines ordered and administered during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The CDC has seen a decline in the number of vaccines ordered and administered through the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, a national program that provides federally-purchased vaccine to roughly 50% of U.S. children that are 18 years of age or younger who meet the following criteria:

  • Medicaid-eligible
  • Uninsured
  • Underinsured (vaccinated at local public health agencies only)
  • American Indian/Alaskan Native

To learn more about COVID-19 and well-child checkups, visit health.mo.gov/wellchild.

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About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at http://health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo

 

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Read more MO DHSS Recent News >>>

Show me Strong Recovery Plan

Missouri Governor Parson released information yesterday afternoon regarding the initial recovery phase for our state. This Order establishes the minimum requirements that must be complied with statewide. Our agency and local authorities are able to enforce more restrictive public health requirements for businesses or individuals depending on the current COVID-19 threat/evaluation of our county.

Pike County’s Stay-At-Home Order expires on Thursday, April 30th at 11:59 p.m. Once this order has expired, residents are encouraged to follow state guidelines of the Stay Home Missouri order and Show-Me Strong Recovery Plan. Even though the state is “opening” this does not mean we are immune to this virus and we should continue to practice social distancing, proper hygiene and other preventative measures to keep our numbers low. We are all ready to get back to “normal” but we need to ensure we are doing so with much caution.

 

The following information was obtained from Missouri Governor Parson’s website

 

Missouri’s initial recovery phase begins May 4, 2020, and during this phase we can gradually start to reopen economic and social activity. This will be a deliberate process, and is flexible to adapt to the situation. Some communities may be able to reopen at a faster rate, while others may need to continue restrictions to keep the virus from spreading. During this time, we should limit our activity and interactions and continue to maintain social distancing and practice good hygiene to protect our neighbors and ourselves.

Show-Me Strong Recovery Order, through May 31, 2020

Stay Home Order, EXTENDED through May 3, 2020

Stay Home Order – FAQs

Stay Home Order, through April 24, 2020

 

SHOW-ME STRONG RECOVERY PLAN: PHASE I
GUIDELINES AND FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Missouri’s economic recovery plan will focus on the diversity of Missouri – its people, businesses, communities, and infrastructure, among others. A strategic “re-opening” of Missouri’s economy will not be successful without proactive steps taken to mitigate risk of COVID-19 resurgence by our state’s businesses, communities, and citizens.

While the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has issued guidance on what the federal government considers “essential businesses,” Governor Parson believes that ALL of Missouri’s businesses and employers are vital to our state’s economy and individual well-being.

General Guidelines to Reopen Missouri’s Economy

During Phase I, we can gradually start to reopen economic and social activity. This will be a deliberate process, and is flexible to adapt to the situation. Some communities may be able to reopen at a faster rate, while others may need to continue restrictions to keep the virus from spreading. During Phase I, we should limit our activity and interactions and continue to maintain social distancing and practice good hygiene to protect our neighbors and ourselves.

The plan to reopen the economy and get Missourians back to work is based on ensuring a healthy workforce by:

  • Flattening the curve and expanding healthcare capacity, while utilizing federal programs and deploying state resources;
  • Making decisions based on Missouri-specific data and medical expertise;
  • Protecting healthcare workers, first responders, and other direct care workers so that our citizens have access to the care they need;
  • Looking after our most vulnerable and at-risk populations;
  • Partnering with community leaders and incorporating flexibility based on each community’s circumstances;
  • Slowing and containing the spread of COVID-19; and
  • Implementing a measured approach to mitigate risk of a resurgence.

The ability to reopen Missouri’s economy rests on both our healthcare system and our healthcare suppliers. Together, we will accomplish the following goals:

  • Rapidly expand testing capacity and volume in the state, including testing for those who are currently contagious and those who have developed immunity to the virus;
  • Expanding reserves of personal protective equipment (PPE) by opening public and private supply chains, and continuing to utilize Missouri businesses in that effort;
  • Continuing to monitor and, if necessary, expanding hospital and health care system capacity, including isolation and alternate care facilities for those that cannot self-quarantine at home; and
  • Improving the ability to predict potential outbreaks using Missouri’s public health data.

General Guidelines for Missourians

  • Citizens who feel sick should stay home
  • Continue to practice good hygiene, including:
  • Washing hands with soap and water, or using hand sanitizer, especially after touching frequently used items or surfaces;
  • Avoiding touching your face;
  • Sneezing or coughing into a tissue, or the inside of your elbow; and
  • Disinfecting frequently used items and surfaces as much as possible.
  • Avoid socializing in groups that do not readily allow for appropriate physical distancing (receptions, trade shows, etc.). When in public (parks, outdoor recreation spaces, shopping malls, etc.), individuals should maximize physical distance from others.
  • Minimize travel to the extent possible.

General Guidelines for Business

  • Prepare to implement basic infection prevention measures informed by industry best practices, regarding:
    • Protective equipment;
    • Temperature checks;
    • Testing, isolating, and contact tracing; and
    • Sanitation, including disinfection of common and high-traffic areas (entrances, breakrooms, locations where there is high-frequency employee interaction with the public/customers).
  • Modify physical workspaces to maximize social distancing.
  • Minimize business travel.
  • Develop an infectious disease preparedness and response plan, including policies and procedures for workforce contact tracing when an employee tests positive for COVID-19.
  • Monitor workforce for indicative symptoms. Do not allow symptomatic people to physically return to work until cleared by a medical provider.
  • Develop, implement, and communicate about workplace flexibilities and protections, including:
    • Encouraging telework whenever possible and feasible with business operations;
    • Returning to work in phases and/or split shifts, if possible;
    • Limiting access to common areas where personnel are likely to congregate and interact; and
    • Ensuring that sick leave policies are flexible and consistent with public health guidance.

General Guidelines for Communities

  • Closely monitor and track the containment, spread, and any resurgence of COVID-19, and adjust plans as necessary.
  • Limit situations where citizens cannot maintain social distancing.
  • Facilitate widespread testing of symptomatic and asymptomatic citizens.
  • Work to protect the most vulnerable populations.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Under guidance from the federal government, we are considered an “essential business.” How does this order affect me?

This order applies to ALL Missouri businesses. Businesses that are categorized as “essential” by the federal government should continue current operations, and incorporate our General Guidelines for Business outlined above.

Businesses that were considered “non-essential” by the federal government may resume operations in Missouri in accordance with the Order and these guidelines.

What if my job requires me to be within six feet (6’) of another employee and/or customer?

The social distancing requirements do not apply to individuals performing job duties that require contact with other people closer than six feet (6’).

Businesses and employees should work together to implement public health and safety measures for employees and customers, using the above direction as a guide, in addition to any guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Under these conditions, businesses such as barber and cosmetology shops, hair salons, and tattoo parlors are allowed to operate.

Gyms and hotel swimming pools can also open if they adhere to strict social distancing and sanitation protocols.

Are there restrictions on businesses?

Yes. Workplaces that are engaged in retail sales to the public must limit the number of customers in each retail location to the following standards based on the workplace’s fire or building code occupancy:

  • For smaller locations (less than 10,000 square feet), they must maintain 25 percent or less of the authorized occupancy;
  • For larger locations (10,000 square feet or greater), they must maintain 10 percent or less of the authorized occupancy.

Employees at the workplace and vendors delivering products into the store are not included in this calculation and do not count toward occupancy limitations.

Are grocery stores considered a business “engaged in retail sales to the public?”

Yes, and such stores are subject to the occupancy limitations in the Order.

Grocery stores are strongly encouraged to set aside hours, outside of regular store hours, to allow third-party grocery delivery services to provide grocery shopping services for their customers. This will allow individual shoppers to shop during regular store hours, and reduce congestion during such times. This will further allow such services to function in an environment where their services may be in excessive demand.

Shoppers at all retail stores are also encouraged, when possible, to limit the number of people shopping in stores to one person per household at any one time. This will better enable all families to access necessary goods in grocery stores, and further reduce the number of individuals necessary to access such goods.

My local jurisdiction does not have a building or fire code. Do the limitations on square footage apply to my retail business?

Yes. If your business is not subject to fire or building code occupancy limitations set by your local jurisdiction, you should calculate your occupancy limits based on the following formula:

For a business with a retail location less than 10,000 square feet:

  • Building Square Feet divided by 30 = Quotient
  • Quotient x .25 = Occupancy Limit

For a business with the retail location of 10,000 square feet or more:

  • Building Square Feet divided by 30 = Quotient
  • Quotient x .10 = Occupancy Limit

Examples:

  • A 40,000 square foot grocery store would be able to have 133 customers in the store at any one time.
  • An 8,000 square foot retail store would be able to have 66 customers in the store at any one time.

My local fire or building code occupancy limitation calculation is lower than that allowed for businesses without any fire or building code limits, or is lower than a neighboring jurisdictions fire or building code limitations. Can I apply the same formula for calculating occupancy for my business as those without a code?

Yes. You may use either the calculation set forth above for businesses without a fire or building code occupancy limitation, or the calculation applied to your business based upon your specific local jurisdiction fire and building code occupancy limitation, whichever is greater.
Examples:

  • My 30,000 square foot retail business has a local jurisdiction fire or building occupancy limitation of 700 people. Using the formula allowing only 10% of the local jurisdiction, I would be able to have 70 customers in my store at any one time. For an identical business without a local fire or occupancy limitation, they would be able to have 100 customers in their store at any one time. Under this guidance, you may have up to 100 customers in your store at any one time.
  • My 6,000 square foot retail business has a local jurisdiction fire or building occupancy limitation of 150 people. Using the formula allowing only 25% of the local jurisdiction, I would be able to have 37 customers in my store at any one time. For an identical business without a local fire or occupancy limitation, they would be able to have 50 customers in their store at any one time. Under this guidance, you may have up to 50 customers in your store at any one time.

My business has a public waiting room with congregate seating. Should I limit access to it?

Implementing a system where customers/citizens can wait inside their vehicles prior to entering the business is strongly encouraged, as are pre-scheduled appointments to minimize interaction between people. In situations where this is not feasible, such as public transit, medical offices, and parks, entities should develop public health and safety measures using the above direction as a guide, in addition to any guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Does this order prevent me from receiving non-emergency healthcare, such as a routine eye exam or dental care?

Medical providers, such as dentists and optometrists, may provide usual services at their discretion. The social distancing requirements do not apply to individuals performing job duties that require contact with other people closer than six feet (6’).

Medical providers should develop and implement public health and safety measures for employees and patients, using the above direction as a guide, in addition to any guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Implementing a system where patients can wait inside their vehicles prior to entering the office is strongly encouraged, as are pre-scheduled and spaced out appointments to minimize interaction between people.

May restaurants open their dining rooms?

Yes. In concert with the Missouri Restaurant Association, we are strongly encouraging restaurants to prioritize public health and safety by implementing measures including, but not limited to, regulating self-serve options such as salad bars and buffets, using disposable menus, and employee use of personal protective equipment if available. Tables and seating shall be spaced out according to social distance requirements.

The continued use of drive-thru, pickup, or delivery options is encouraged.

Food court establishments may operate, but the social distancing and communal seating requirements will prevent them from offering seating.

How do these guidelines apply to childcare facilities?

Daycares, childcare providers, or schools providing childcare for working families can continue operations, but should follow the CDC guidance targeted for those operations found at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/guidance-for-childcare.html.

May I attend service at my place of worship?

Yes. As long as the social distancing requirements are followed, places of worship are allowed to hold in-person services. Common practices that may occur with worship services, such as hand shaking and shared communion cups, should be avoided. Places of worship are also encouraged to continue use of alternative means of services through streaming services and other opportunities.

I am a member of a fraternal organization. Are we allowed to open our building and meet?

Yes. Fraternal organizations such as the Knights of Columbus and the Fraternal Order of Eagles may gather, but must adhere to the social distancing and communal seating areas requirements.

Will I still be able to participate in my local parks and recreation organized activities and/or camps this summer?

Yes. Traditional summer activities such as utilizing aquatic facilities, community centers, fitness centers, libraries, organized athletics, and camps offer a variety of recreational opportunities for Missouri citizens. If these services are offered, we encourage adjustments be considered to mitigate the risks of contracting or spreading COVID-19 between participants, patrons, and staff, such as limiting the number of participants, modifying activities, restructuring programs, and increasing sanitization measures for facilities and participants.

We also advise areas of high touch or high traffic, such as playgrounds, remain closed.

Can I attend an event at a large venue or stadium, or go to a movie theater?

Yes. However, seating shall be spaced out according to social distancing requirements.

This will apply to events such as amusement parks and attractions, concerts, funerals, museums, school graduations and weddings.

How will this order be enforced?

The State is working with local health authorities to support the order. Local health authorities and law enforcement maintain the same jurisdiction and authority they have always had.

Can my local health authority impose requirements that are more restrictive?

Yes. This Order establishes the minimum requirements that must be complied with statewide. Local health authorities may enforce more restrictive public health requirements for businesses or individuals.

The only exception is the Order from the Director of the Department of Health and Senior Services dated March 24, 2020, removing the authority of a local health authority from closing or restricting the operations of a business which is a part of the food supply, whether that be agricultural production, manufacturing, distribution, or sale of food. This limited waiver does not limit the authority of a local health authority from closing or restricting the operations of a retail food establishment.

How long is this order in effect?

The Order is in place through Sunday, May 31, 2020. The Order will be re-evaluated before it expires, and may be further restricted, less restricted, or extended in the current form.

 

This information directly from Missouri Governor Parson’s Website >>>

Evidence of Community Spread of COVID-19 in Pike County, MO

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 27, 2020

Media Contact:

Tracy Brookshier, Public Information Officer

tbrookshier@pikecountyhealth.org

Media Line: (573) 324-2111 ext. 140

 

Community Spread of COVID-19 in Pike County, MO

 

Pike County, MO- Pike County has now seen evidence of community spread of COVID-19 in 2 cases. Community spread means people have been infected in an area (such as a county), including some who are not sure how or where they became infected. Pike County Health Department staff has begun contact investigations and notifications regarding these two cases. Any close contacts of positive cases will be contacted individually.

 

These community spread cases highlight the extreme importance of social distancing and following the recommended guidelines to stay safe including avoiding social gatherings of more than 10 people and staying home whenever possible. If individuals must go out for essential activities, such as work or getting supplies, they shall keep a distance of 6 feet from others, wear face coverings and practice proper hygiene. Other essential activities include engaging in tasks essential to health.

 

Close contacts are considered those who were within 6 feet with no face coverings for more than 10 minutes and up to 48 hours of when the positive case developed symptoms. It is unnecessary to list itineraries for cases where close contacts are able to be identified throughout the investigation process. Thus far, all case investigations have been able to identify all close contacts. At a time where a positive case would have been in a public setting within close contact of unknown individuals would be when the listing of an itinerary would become potentially necessary to ensure public safety.

 

At this time there are 2 cases that are hospitalized and the others are/were in in-home isolation.

 

Residents can expect weekday case count updates at 9:00 a.m. & 3:00 p.m. Case counts can be found on the Pike County Health Department website, Facebook and Twitter pages. Because Missouri’s numbers have grown, the state lab is only sending positive results. Pike County Health Department will only be providing the updated total number of positives in the county each day and are unable to list accurate numbers for pending cases or negative results.

 

The Pike County Health Department would like to remind residents to get their information from credible and reliable sources, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.CDC.gov , the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services at www.health.mo.gov and the Pike County Health Department at www.pikecountyhealth.org For general questions about COVID-19, individuals can call the Missouri hotline number at (877) 435-8411.

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