82 Pike County Residents Tested at Drive-Thru Event

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PIKE COUNTY, MO. (June 25, 2020) – Pike County was chosen as one of the National Guard & Department of Health and Senior Services testing sites for the numerous Drive-Thru COVID-19 testing events that were organized. As your local Health Department, it was our duty to establish a location that would fit the need for such an event and help inform the community of the service it would be providing.

On Friday, June 19th, 2020 the National Guard tested 111 people that registered for a drive-thru time slot. Out of those 111 people 82 were Pike County residents. 3 Pike County residents were contacted that they tested positive for Coronavirus. The results of investigating these positive cases determined that 1 case was a previous positive case that was re-tested and the 2 new cases were symptomatic close contacts to an already confirmed case.

“I felt like the event went smoothly and the National Guard did a great job keeping it running smoothly,” said Rhonda Stumbaugh, Pike County Health Department Administrator. “I was glad to see how many people came to take advantage of this free event. I was pleased to find out that out of the 82 Pike County residents whom were tested there were no asymptomatic positive cases. We had expected the 2 new cases, so it was nice to see that we really had no unexpected positive cases arise from the event,” added Stumbaugh.

As the state is now fully open for business we would like to remind everyone to continue taking safety measures to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses by washing your hands often and staying home when you are sick.


GOVERNOR PARSON ANNOUNCES MISSOURI WILL FULLY REOPEN, ENTER PHASE 2 OF RECOVERY PLAN ON JUNE 16

 — Pending expiration of Phase 1 on June 15, Governor Mike Parson announced today that Missouri will fully reopen and enter Phase 2 of its “Show Me Strong Recovery” Plan on Tuesday, June 16, 2020.

“It is truly incredible to think about how far Missouri has come since March. At that time, no one knew what to expect. There was a lot of uncertainty, worry, and concern,” Governor Parson said. “Here we are today, just over 90 days since our first COVID-19 case in Missouri, and I am proud to say we have overcome all of these challenges and more than met our four pillars to reopen.”

During Phase 2, there will be no statewide health order. All statewide restrictions will be lifted, though local officials will still have the authority to put further rules, regulations, or ordinances in place.

The decision to reopen was dependent on the four essential “Show Me Strong Recovery” pillars:

  1. Expand testing capacity and volume in the state
  2. Expand reserves of PPE by opening public and private supply chains
  3. Continue to monitor and, if necessary, expand hospital and health care system capacity
  4. Improve ability to predict potential outbreaks using Missouri’s public health data

Weekly testing in Missouri has increased more than 220 percent from approximately 16,000 test encounters the week of April 20 to over 53,000 encounters the week of May 25. Over the past two weeks, the state has averaged more than 10,000 tests per weekday.

Missouri continues to receive and distribute PPE across the state. Yesterday, the state reached a record PPE shipment, expanding to include not only hospitals, health care facilities, and EMS but also dental offices as more are reopening across the state. Yesterday’s shipments included the following:

  • 17,230 gowns
  • 42,720 N95 masks
  • 262,000 gloves
  • 77,100 surgical masks
  • 18,432 face shields

Missouri has also received national recognition for the use of its PPE marketplace, which helps health care providers with Missouri manufactures and suppliers. Currently, there are over 100 hospitals, 436 suppliers, and 1,567 health care providers, businesses, and other organizations registered in the PPE marketplace.

Regarding hospital capacity, hospitalizations fell by 43 percent statewide from May 1 to June 10. In April, the state converted a hotel into an alternate care site in just 11 days.

Missouri now also has a comprehensive COVID-19 dashboard containing data from across the state on testing, positivity rate, deaths, and hospitalizations. Much of the data is broken down further by county or demographics.

“We have learned and accomplished so much since March. Knowing what we know now, we are much better prepared to deal with COVID-19 going forward, and we are fully confident that Missouri is ready to take the next step,” Governor Parson said.

While Missouri will fully reopen on June 16, Governor Parson emphasized the importance of continuing social distancing and practicing proper hygiene to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

“We must remember that COVID-19 is not gone,” Governor Parson said. “It is still extremely important for everyone to continue social distancing. Be proactive. Avoid large, congested crowds, and if you can’t social distance, take extra precautions to protect yourself and those around you.”

“We all know how to do this now, and it is up to us to take responsibility for our own actions,” Governor Parson continued.

In preparation of Phase 2, Governor Parson signed Executive Order 20-12 extending the state of emergency in Missouri through December 30, 2020, in order to utilize federal CARES Act funding. Extending the state of emergency will also allow continued flexibility in deploying resources around the state as Missouri reopens and recovers from COVID-19.

Executive Order 20-12 also further extends four previous Executive Orders assisting with Missouri’s COVID-19 response through December 30:

  • Executive Order 20-04 easing regulatory burdens and certain provisions related to telemedicine and motor carriers
  • Executive Order 20-05 allowing the sale of unprepared restaurant foods to the public
  • Executive Order 20-06 mobilizing the National Guard in our response efforts
  • Executive Order 20-08 waiving the requirement for a person to be physically present in front of a notary public

Extending these Executive Orders is consistent with the emergency declaration and gives Missourians more time to adjust as the state works through the economic recovery process. To view Executive Order 20-12, click here.

Governor Parson was joined today by Missouri Department of Economic Development Director Rob Dixon to share more details about the state’s recovery plans as well as a new economic recovery dashboard.

To view Governor Parson’s remarks from today’s briefing, click here. Pictures will be available on Governor Parson’s Flickr page.

VISIT THE OFFICIAL ONLINE PRESS RELEASE >>>

Drive-through Community COVID-19 Testing in Pike County

COMMUNITY COVID-19 TESTING IN PIKE COUNTY:

FRIDAY, JUNE 19

PIKE COUNTY, MO – The Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services (DHSS) and Missouri National Guard will perform drive-through community testing for COVID-19 at the Pike County Fairgrounds on Friday June 19 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The test is open to all Missouri residents; they do not have to have COVID-19 symptoms to be eligible for the test. There is no cost for the test for the individual. Any Missouri resident who wants to be tested with a nasal swab to see if they have an active COVID-19 infection can do so.

Appointments are available through DHSS at www.health.mo.gov/communitytest or by calling the state hotline at (877) 435- 8411. Individuals will be given a 15-minute appointment block.

 

“We are grateful for the opportunity to partner with Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services and the Missouri National Guard on this event,” said Rhonda Stumbaugh, Administrator. “It will help in the efforts to learn more about the prevalence of COVID-19 transmission in our area and we hope our community will consider choosing to take advantage of this opportunity.”

The address for the Pike County Fairgrounds is 15884 US-54, Bowling Green, MO 63334. There are 21 counties statewide conducting testing over a 2-week period, beginning on June 8. DHSS has stated that the goal is to test 10,900 people over those 2 weeks.

According to DHSS, location selection for this period of community sampling is based on inadequate testing according to the number of confirmed cases and the number of total tests conducted prior to these events. Counties hosting upcoming community testing events are Scott, Platte, Stoddard, Carter, Ripley, Cass, Franklin, Johnson, Pettis, Lafayette, Ray, Warren, Carroll, Chariton, Lincoln, Lewis, Moniteau, Pike, Scotland, Montgomery and Osage.

Upon arrival at the testing site, individuals will drive through, and be asked questions, including about symptoms they may or may not have. Members of the National Guard will collect the nasopharyngeal specimen.

Those who receive a positive test should stay home, isolate themselves and call their health care provider if they have any concerns.

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GOVERNOR PARSON EXTENDS PHASE 1 OF “SHOW ME STRONG RECOVERY” PLAN THROUGH JUNE 15

 — During today’s COVID-19 briefing, Governor Mike Parson announced that Phase 1 of the state’s “Show Me Strong Recovery” Plan has been extended from Sunday, May 31, 2020, through Monday, June 15, 2020.

“We are very pleased with how well Phase 1 has gone so far,” Governor Parson said. “Businesses, communities, and Missourians across the state have done a great job of implementing health and safety measures, and we continue to be encouraged by data across the state.”

Resting on four essential pillars, the “Show Me Strong Recovery” Plan is intended to protect those most at risk of exposure to COVID-19 while helping Missouri recover economically:

  1. Expand testing capacity and volume in the state
  2. Expand reserves of PPE by opening public and private supply chains
  3. Continue to monitor and, if necessary, expand hospital and health care system capacity
  4. Improve ability to predict potential outbreaks using Missouri’s public health data

Extending Phase 1 of the plan through June 15 aligns with Governor Parson’s other Executive Orders as well as the state of emergency in Missouri.

Additionally, some communities are farther along than others in the recovery process. Extending Phase 1 will give communities more time to prepare and align efforts as the state continues working toward Phase 2.

“I want to assure you that our efforts are showing positive results, and we are still in a good place with all four of our recovery pillars,” Governor Parson said. “We are extending Phase 1 not because Missouri has taken steps back, but because we want to continue the progress we’ve made and make sure we are fully prepared for Phase 2.”

During Phase 1, citizens may re-engage in economic and social activities but must adhere to social distancing requirements, including maintaining six feet of space between individuals in most cases.

There are currently no limitations on social gatherings as long as necessary precautions are taken and six feet of distance can be maintained between individuals and/or families. Additionally, all businesses can be open provided that the social distancing guidelines set forth in the health order are followed.

Local officials will still have the authority to put further rules, regulations, or ordinances in place so long as they are not inconsistent with the statewide order.

To view the full public health order, click here. For additional guidelines and frequently asked questions, click here. More information on the “Show Me Strong Recovery” Plan can be found at showmestrong.mo.gov.

Aligning with economic recovery, Governor Parson also announced during today’s briefing that Tooling Tech Group (TTG), the second largest tooling provider in the United States, is investing $4.5 million to expand its Washington, Missouri, operations by 21,000 square feet.

TTG currently operates out of 114,000 square feet at two locations in Washington – Town & Country Industrial Park and 431 W-W Industrial Park where the expansion is underway.

The Washington division specializes in engineer-to-order die cast tooling for the automotive and outdoor products industries, including extensive die repair and laser welding capability. The company plans to increase its team by 25 over the next five years with engineers, programmers, precision machinists, and die mechanics.

“Throughout these challenging times, Missouri has remained strong and resilient,” Governor Parson said. “Seeing companies like Tooling Tech Group expand in our state gives us hope and confidence as we move forward on the path to economic recovery.”

From a testing standpoint, Missouri continues to make progress with its COVID-19 testing plan. From May 20 through May 27, the state exceeded both its sentinel and community sampling testing goals.

For sentinel testing, 6,466 tests were planned from May 20 through May 27, and 8,127 tests were conducted. For community sampling, 2,250 tests were planned, and 2,971 were conducted. The state came very close to its goal for box-in testing, completing approximately 4,539 tests out of a planned 4,670.

In addition to efforts at the state level, CVS Health today announced it will open 22 new COVID-19 testing sites at select CVS Pharmacy drive-thru locations across Missouri as part of its nationwide COVID-19 response. Self-swab tests will be available to individuals meeting Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria as well as state and age guidelines.

Patients will remain in their vehicles and be directed to the pharmacy drive-thru window. At the window, they will be provided with a test kit and instructions. A CVS Pharmacy team member will observe the self-swab process to ensure it is done properly. Tests will then be sent to an independent, third-party lab for processing, and the results will be available in approximately three days.

“These testing sites will be a huge help as we continue to increase testing in Missouri, and we are grateful for CVS’s commitment to slowing the spread and keeping our citizens healthy and safe,” Governor Parson said.

For updates on COVID-19 cases, testing, deaths, and hospitalizations in Missouri, view the state’s interactive dashboard.

VIEW THE OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE >>>

MODHSS | Community COVID-19 sampling events to be conducted throughout Missouri

May 22, 2020

Community COVID-19 sampling events to be conducted throughout Missouri

Media Contact:
Lisa Cox
Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
Lisa.Cox@health.mo.gov

JEFFERSON CITY, MO – Several counties throughout Missouri have already participated in community sampling efforts in order for public health officials to learn more about the prevalence of COVID-19 transmission. As part of Gov. Mike Parson’s plan announced on May 21 to rapidly increase COVID-19 testing volume to 7,500 tests per day in Missouri, six additional counties will host testing events. The goal is to test nearly 10,000 people over a 10-day period at events in Boone, Cape Girardeau, Greene, Jackson, Jefferson and St. Charles Counties.

Community sampling gives the state a better sense of COVID-19 prevalence in a given area, which will help guide its response and ease uncertainty for Missourians. If prevalence is low, this will help reassure citizens that it is safe to begin re-engaging in the community and returning to somewhat normal operations. If prevalence is higher, quick and proactive steps will be taken to keep the virus from spreading further in the community.

Any Missouri residents who wish to be tested with a nasal swab to see if they have an active COVID-19 infection can do so at the specified sites in each region at no cost to the individual. Missouri residency is the only requirement; individuals do not have to live in the county in which they are tested, and they do not have to be experiencing symptoms. 

  • Boone County
    • June 1-2, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Hickman High School, Columbia
  • Cape Girardeau County
    • June 5, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Arena Park, Cape Girardeau
  • Greene County
    • June 4-5, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Ozark Empire Fairgrounds, Springfield
  • Jackson County
    • May 26-30, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Silverstein Eye Center Arena, Independence
  • Jefferson County
    • June 1-2, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Faith Community Church, House Springs
    • June 3, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Hillsboro Civic Center, Hillsboro
  • St. Charles County
    • May 26-28, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., St. Charles County Public Health Department, St. Charles
    • May 29-30, 7 a.m.-7 p.m.. The Youth Activity Park, Dardenne Prairie

Online pre-registration is highly encouraged and will allow for the testing event to run efficiently for patients. Those without access to online pre-registration can call the Missouri COVID-19 hotline for registration assistance at 877-435-8411.

Selection for community sampling is based on locations with the ability to draw participants from a broader region as well as locations that have expressed a need for additional testing resources. It is not based on the number of COVID-19 cases in these counties. CARES Act funding will be used for community sampling. Some counties have also elected to provide community sampling using local funding.

The community-based testing will be operated by the Department of Health and Senior Services and Missouri National Guard in coordination with the hosting local public health agencies.

Over the next two weeks, the state will aggressively execute on this testing strategy, as well as the box-in strategy for outbreaks within facilities and sentinel testing of vulnerable populations. With these strategies in place in addition to the testing already occurring each day, Department of Health and Senior Services Director Dr. Randall Williams believes the state will reach its goal of 7,500 tests per day. “We have worked hard to determine how to best utilize the testing capacity we now have in our state in order to protect the health of Missourians,” he said.

Once Missouri’s overall testing numbers have increased, the state will reevaluate and determine next steps.

“I cannot emphasize enough how important testing is to our overall recovery plan. All four pillars of our recovery plan are important, but testing will be the key,” Gov. Parson said. “The more testing we do, the more knowledge we have on what the situation in Missouri actually looks like, and the better-equipped we are to move forward.”

Those who would like to be tested can pre-register for the site nearest them at health.mo.gov/communitytest. More information can be found at health.mo.gov/coronavirus.

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About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at http://health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo

 

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Read more News Releases from MODHSS >>>

Protecting our Communities is a Team Effort

Food Vendor - Food Safety Training | Mobile Food Vendor - Food ...

As summer starts to make its way into our area that means that more events will soon be organized. While our agency continues to recommend that our county residents follow the guidelines issued by the State of Missouri as well as the CDC, we strive to assist local businesses, schools, and community organizations on how to implement these recommended actions.

As your local Health Department, our role is to help the community understand and put into action these recommendations through guidance and education. While these guidelines are only recommendations for what we can do during these re-opening phases to slow the spread of COVID-19, we urge the community to continue making safe decisions particularly in ways that protect persons at increased risk of severe illness. During this phase we continue to encourage social distancing and proper hand hygiene as it is each individuals responsibility to take action against this virus.

 

We encourage the public and community entities to reach out to us if you would like assistance in how to implement mitigation strategies during these re-opening phases. Please use our COVID-19 contact form that can be found on our dedicated COVID-19 webpage found on our website at www.pikecountyhealth.org or call 573-324-2111.

PCHD Reports First COVID-19 Death

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Media Contact:

Tracy Brookshier, Public Information Officer

tbrookshier@pikecountyhealth.org

Media Line: (573) 324-2111 ext. 140

 

 

Pike Health Department Reports First Death of COVID-19

 

PIKE COUNTY, MO (May 8, 2020) – The Pike Health Department today was notified of the first death of a Pike County resident due to COVID-19. The resident was an elderly female.  She test positive for COVID-19 on April 24, 2020.

“It is with a heavy heart that we extend our sympathy,” says Administrator Rhonda Stumbaugh “our thoughts and prayers are with the family at this time”.

Stumbaugh stressed the importance of following guidelines from the Missouri Department of Health as well as the Pike County Health Department.  It is a crucial time, she said, “that we all work together and do our part to stop the spread of COVID-19 to prevent any more precious lives taken as a result of this virus”.

Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for more serious complications from COVID-19. If you think, you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your health care provider for medical advice before showing up.

For more information, visit the DHSS website at www.health.mo.gov/coronavirus or the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus. A statewide COVID-19 hotline also operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 877-435-8411.

 

Download the press release here >>>

 

 

Show me Strong Recovery Plan

Missouri Governor Parson released information yesterday afternoon regarding the initial recovery phase for our state. This Order establishes the minimum requirements that must be complied with statewide. Our agency and local authorities are able to enforce more restrictive public health requirements for businesses or individuals depending on the current COVID-19 threat/evaluation of our county.

Pike County’s Stay-At-Home Order expires on Thursday, April 30th at 11:59 p.m. Once this order has expired, residents are encouraged to follow state guidelines of the Stay Home Missouri order and Show-Me Strong Recovery Plan. Even though the state is “opening” this does not mean we are immune to this virus and we should continue to practice social distancing, proper hygiene and other preventative measures to keep our numbers low. We are all ready to get back to “normal” but we need to ensure we are doing so with much caution.

 

The following information was obtained from Missouri Governor Parson’s website

 

Missouri’s initial recovery phase begins May 4, 2020, and during this phase we can gradually start to reopen economic and social activity. This will be a deliberate process, and is flexible to adapt to the situation. Some communities may be able to reopen at a faster rate, while others may need to continue restrictions to keep the virus from spreading. During this time, we should limit our activity and interactions and continue to maintain social distancing and practice good hygiene to protect our neighbors and ourselves.

Show-Me Strong Recovery Order, through May 31, 2020

Stay Home Order, EXTENDED through May 3, 2020

Stay Home Order – FAQs

Stay Home Order, through April 24, 2020

 

SHOW-ME STRONG RECOVERY PLAN: PHASE I
GUIDELINES AND FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Missouri’s economic recovery plan will focus on the diversity of Missouri – its people, businesses, communities, and infrastructure, among others. A strategic “re-opening” of Missouri’s economy will not be successful without proactive steps taken to mitigate risk of COVID-19 resurgence by our state’s businesses, communities, and citizens.

While the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has issued guidance on what the federal government considers “essential businesses,” Governor Parson believes that ALL of Missouri’s businesses and employers are vital to our state’s economy and individual well-being.

General Guidelines to Reopen Missouri’s Economy

During Phase I, we can gradually start to reopen economic and social activity. This will be a deliberate process, and is flexible to adapt to the situation. Some communities may be able to reopen at a faster rate, while others may need to continue restrictions to keep the virus from spreading. During Phase I, we should limit our activity and interactions and continue to maintain social distancing and practice good hygiene to protect our neighbors and ourselves.

The plan to reopen the economy and get Missourians back to work is based on ensuring a healthy workforce by:

  • Flattening the curve and expanding healthcare capacity, while utilizing federal programs and deploying state resources;
  • Making decisions based on Missouri-specific data and medical expertise;
  • Protecting healthcare workers, first responders, and other direct care workers so that our citizens have access to the care they need;
  • Looking after our most vulnerable and at-risk populations;
  • Partnering with community leaders and incorporating flexibility based on each community’s circumstances;
  • Slowing and containing the spread of COVID-19; and
  • Implementing a measured approach to mitigate risk of a resurgence.

The ability to reopen Missouri’s economy rests on both our healthcare system and our healthcare suppliers. Together, we will accomplish the following goals:

  • Rapidly expand testing capacity and volume in the state, including testing for those who are currently contagious and those who have developed immunity to the virus;
  • Expanding reserves of personal protective equipment (PPE) by opening public and private supply chains, and continuing to utilize Missouri businesses in that effort;
  • Continuing to monitor and, if necessary, expanding hospital and health care system capacity, including isolation and alternate care facilities for those that cannot self-quarantine at home; and
  • Improving the ability to predict potential outbreaks using Missouri’s public health data.

General Guidelines for Missourians

  • Citizens who feel sick should stay home
  • Continue to practice good hygiene, including:
  • Washing hands with soap and water, or using hand sanitizer, especially after touching frequently used items or surfaces;
  • Avoiding touching your face;
  • Sneezing or coughing into a tissue, or the inside of your elbow; and
  • Disinfecting frequently used items and surfaces as much as possible.
  • Avoid socializing in groups that do not readily allow for appropriate physical distancing (receptions, trade shows, etc.). When in public (parks, outdoor recreation spaces, shopping malls, etc.), individuals should maximize physical distance from others.
  • Minimize travel to the extent possible.

General Guidelines for Business

  • Prepare to implement basic infection prevention measures informed by industry best practices, regarding:
    • Protective equipment;
    • Temperature checks;
    • Testing, isolating, and contact tracing; and
    • Sanitation, including disinfection of common and high-traffic areas (entrances, breakrooms, locations where there is high-frequency employee interaction with the public/customers).
  • Modify physical workspaces to maximize social distancing.
  • Minimize business travel.
  • Develop an infectious disease preparedness and response plan, including policies and procedures for workforce contact tracing when an employee tests positive for COVID-19.
  • Monitor workforce for indicative symptoms. Do not allow symptomatic people to physically return to work until cleared by a medical provider.
  • Develop, implement, and communicate about workplace flexibilities and protections, including:
    • Encouraging telework whenever possible and feasible with business operations;
    • Returning to work in phases and/or split shifts, if possible;
    • Limiting access to common areas where personnel are likely to congregate and interact; and
    • Ensuring that sick leave policies are flexible and consistent with public health guidance.

General Guidelines for Communities

  • Closely monitor and track the containment, spread, and any resurgence of COVID-19, and adjust plans as necessary.
  • Limit situations where citizens cannot maintain social distancing.
  • Facilitate widespread testing of symptomatic and asymptomatic citizens.
  • Work to protect the most vulnerable populations.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Under guidance from the federal government, we are considered an “essential business.” How does this order affect me?

This order applies to ALL Missouri businesses. Businesses that are categorized as “essential” by the federal government should continue current operations, and incorporate our General Guidelines for Business outlined above.

Businesses that were considered “non-essential” by the federal government may resume operations in Missouri in accordance with the Order and these guidelines.

What if my job requires me to be within six feet (6’) of another employee and/or customer?

The social distancing requirements do not apply to individuals performing job duties that require contact with other people closer than six feet (6’).

Businesses and employees should work together to implement public health and safety measures for employees and customers, using the above direction as a guide, in addition to any guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Under these conditions, businesses such as barber and cosmetology shops, hair salons, and tattoo parlors are allowed to operate.

Gyms and hotel swimming pools can also open if they adhere to strict social distancing and sanitation protocols.

Are there restrictions on businesses?

Yes. Workplaces that are engaged in retail sales to the public must limit the number of customers in each retail location to the following standards based on the workplace’s fire or building code occupancy:

  • For smaller locations (less than 10,000 square feet), they must maintain 25 percent or less of the authorized occupancy;
  • For larger locations (10,000 square feet or greater), they must maintain 10 percent or less of the authorized occupancy.

Employees at the workplace and vendors delivering products into the store are not included in this calculation and do not count toward occupancy limitations.

Are grocery stores considered a business “engaged in retail sales to the public?”

Yes, and such stores are subject to the occupancy limitations in the Order.

Grocery stores are strongly encouraged to set aside hours, outside of regular store hours, to allow third-party grocery delivery services to provide grocery shopping services for their customers. This will allow individual shoppers to shop during regular store hours, and reduce congestion during such times. This will further allow such services to function in an environment where their services may be in excessive demand.

Shoppers at all retail stores are also encouraged, when possible, to limit the number of people shopping in stores to one person per household at any one time. This will better enable all families to access necessary goods in grocery stores, and further reduce the number of individuals necessary to access such goods.

My local jurisdiction does not have a building or fire code. Do the limitations on square footage apply to my retail business?

Yes. If your business is not subject to fire or building code occupancy limitations set by your local jurisdiction, you should calculate your occupancy limits based on the following formula:

For a business with a retail location less than 10,000 square feet:

  • Building Square Feet divided by 30 = Quotient
  • Quotient x .25 = Occupancy Limit

For a business with the retail location of 10,000 square feet or more:

  • Building Square Feet divided by 30 = Quotient
  • Quotient x .10 = Occupancy Limit

Examples:

  • A 40,000 square foot grocery store would be able to have 133 customers in the store at any one time.
  • An 8,000 square foot retail store would be able to have 66 customers in the store at any one time.

My local fire or building code occupancy limitation calculation is lower than that allowed for businesses without any fire or building code limits, or is lower than a neighboring jurisdictions fire or building code limitations. Can I apply the same formula for calculating occupancy for my business as those without a code?

Yes. You may use either the calculation set forth above for businesses without a fire or building code occupancy limitation, or the calculation applied to your business based upon your specific local jurisdiction fire and building code occupancy limitation, whichever is greater.
Examples:

  • My 30,000 square foot retail business has a local jurisdiction fire or building occupancy limitation of 700 people. Using the formula allowing only 10% of the local jurisdiction, I would be able to have 70 customers in my store at any one time. For an identical business without a local fire or occupancy limitation, they would be able to have 100 customers in their store at any one time. Under this guidance, you may have up to 100 customers in your store at any one time.
  • My 6,000 square foot retail business has a local jurisdiction fire or building occupancy limitation of 150 people. Using the formula allowing only 25% of the local jurisdiction, I would be able to have 37 customers in my store at any one time. For an identical business without a local fire or occupancy limitation, they would be able to have 50 customers in their store at any one time. Under this guidance, you may have up to 50 customers in your store at any one time.

My business has a public waiting room with congregate seating. Should I limit access to it?

Implementing a system where customers/citizens can wait inside their vehicles prior to entering the business is strongly encouraged, as are pre-scheduled appointments to minimize interaction between people. In situations where this is not feasible, such as public transit, medical offices, and parks, entities should develop public health and safety measures using the above direction as a guide, in addition to any guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Does this order prevent me from receiving non-emergency healthcare, such as a routine eye exam or dental care?

Medical providers, such as dentists and optometrists, may provide usual services at their discretion. The social distancing requirements do not apply to individuals performing job duties that require contact with other people closer than six feet (6’).

Medical providers should develop and implement public health and safety measures for employees and patients, using the above direction as a guide, in addition to any guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Implementing a system where patients can wait inside their vehicles prior to entering the office is strongly encouraged, as are pre-scheduled and spaced out appointments to minimize interaction between people.

May restaurants open their dining rooms?

Yes. In concert with the Missouri Restaurant Association, we are strongly encouraging restaurants to prioritize public health and safety by implementing measures including, but not limited to, regulating self-serve options such as salad bars and buffets, using disposable menus, and employee use of personal protective equipment if available. Tables and seating shall be spaced out according to social distance requirements.

The continued use of drive-thru, pickup, or delivery options is encouraged.

Food court establishments may operate, but the social distancing and communal seating requirements will prevent them from offering seating.

How do these guidelines apply to childcare facilities?

Daycares, childcare providers, or schools providing childcare for working families can continue operations, but should follow the CDC guidance targeted for those operations found at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/guidance-for-childcare.html.

May I attend service at my place of worship?

Yes. As long as the social distancing requirements are followed, places of worship are allowed to hold in-person services. Common practices that may occur with worship services, such as hand shaking and shared communion cups, should be avoided. Places of worship are also encouraged to continue use of alternative means of services through streaming services and other opportunities.

I am a member of a fraternal organization. Are we allowed to open our building and meet?

Yes. Fraternal organizations such as the Knights of Columbus and the Fraternal Order of Eagles may gather, but must adhere to the social distancing and communal seating areas requirements.

Will I still be able to participate in my local parks and recreation organized activities and/or camps this summer?

Yes. Traditional summer activities such as utilizing aquatic facilities, community centers, fitness centers, libraries, organized athletics, and camps offer a variety of recreational opportunities for Missouri citizens. If these services are offered, we encourage adjustments be considered to mitigate the risks of contracting or spreading COVID-19 between participants, patrons, and staff, such as limiting the number of participants, modifying activities, restructuring programs, and increasing sanitization measures for facilities and participants.

We also advise areas of high touch or high traffic, such as playgrounds, remain closed.

Can I attend an event at a large venue or stadium, or go to a movie theater?

Yes. However, seating shall be spaced out according to social distancing requirements.

This will apply to events such as amusement parks and attractions, concerts, funerals, museums, school graduations and weddings.

How will this order be enforced?

The State is working with local health authorities to support the order. Local health authorities and law enforcement maintain the same jurisdiction and authority they have always had.

Can my local health authority impose requirements that are more restrictive?

Yes. This Order establishes the minimum requirements that must be complied with statewide. Local health authorities may enforce more restrictive public health requirements for businesses or individuals.

The only exception is the Order from the Director of the Department of Health and Senior Services dated March 24, 2020, removing the authority of a local health authority from closing or restricting the operations of a business which is a part of the food supply, whether that be agricultural production, manufacturing, distribution, or sale of food. This limited waiver does not limit the authority of a local health authority from closing or restricting the operations of a retail food establishment.

How long is this order in effect?

The Order is in place through Sunday, May 31, 2020. The Order will be re-evaluated before it expires, and may be further restricted, less restricted, or extended in the current form.

 

This information directly from Missouri Governor Parson’s Website >>>

Evidence of Community Spread of COVID-19 in Pike County, MO

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 27, 2020

Media Contact:

Tracy Brookshier, Public Information Officer

tbrookshier@pikecountyhealth.org

Media Line: (573) 324-2111 ext. 140

 

Community Spread of COVID-19 in Pike County, MO

 

Pike County, MO- Pike County has now seen evidence of community spread of COVID-19 in 2 cases. Community spread means people have been infected in an area (such as a county), including some who are not sure how or where they became infected. Pike County Health Department staff has begun contact investigations and notifications regarding these two cases. Any close contacts of positive cases will be contacted individually.

 

These community spread cases highlight the extreme importance of social distancing and following the recommended guidelines to stay safe including avoiding social gatherings of more than 10 people and staying home whenever possible. If individuals must go out for essential activities, such as work or getting supplies, they shall keep a distance of 6 feet from others, wear face coverings and practice proper hygiene. Other essential activities include engaging in tasks essential to health.

 

Close contacts are considered those who were within 6 feet with no face coverings for more than 10 minutes and up to 48 hours of when the positive case developed symptoms. It is unnecessary to list itineraries for cases where close contacts are able to be identified throughout the investigation process. Thus far, all case investigations have been able to identify all close contacts. At a time where a positive case would have been in a public setting within close contact of unknown individuals would be when the listing of an itinerary would become potentially necessary to ensure public safety.

 

At this time there are 2 cases that are hospitalized and the others are/were in in-home isolation.

 

Residents can expect weekday case count updates at 9:00 a.m. & 3:00 p.m. Case counts can be found on the Pike County Health Department website, Facebook and Twitter pages. Because Missouri’s numbers have grown, the state lab is only sending positive results. Pike County Health Department will only be providing the updated total number of positives in the county each day and are unable to list accurate numbers for pending cases or negative results.

 

The Pike County Health Department would like to remind residents to get their information from credible and reliable sources, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.CDC.gov , the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services at www.health.mo.gov and the Pike County Health Department at www.pikecountyhealth.org For general questions about COVID-19, individuals can call the Missouri hotline number at (877) 435-8411.

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7th Case of COVID-19 in Pike County, Missouri Confirmed

Today we report 1 more positive case of COVID-19 in Pike County that is currently under investigation.
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As it has been 14 consecutive days since our last confirmed positive case we remain cautiously optimistic that our county will continue to slow the spread.
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To say we are PROUD of our county would be an understatement.
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Pike County, Missouri has a population of over 18,504* people and we have reported 7 positive cases to date during this pandemic. Put that into percentage form and you will get an approximate 0.037% of our county population that tested positive with the novel-coronavirus (COVID-19).

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We take the health of our community very seriously and it is very apparent that our residents do too. As our expertise is in public health, you can’t imagine how great of a feeling that is for us. Our friends, families and neighbors have taken this pandemic seriously and because of that we have very low numbers of positive cases within our county; together we can ensure it stays that way.

With the nation gearing up to re-open in the recommended phases, it will be our duty as your local Public Health Department to work with other state and local officials to ensure we are doing so in a way that we can reduce the chance of COVID-19 making a return.

The businesses in our county have done an incredible job of getting creative with safe ways to serve the community through this time of uncertainty and we are confident they will continue to do so.

We continue to urge residents to keep taking the preventative measures so that we do not see another spike in cases. It is unclear when we can consider ourselves back to “normal” but we are confident that we will get there safely with the help of the amazing residents of Pike County, Missouri….
THAT’S YOU! THANK YOU!

*Population from 2018 census.